Distributed transaction

distributed transaction is a database transaction in which two or more network hosts are involved. Usually, hosts provide transactional resources, while the transaction manager is responsible for creating and managing a global transaction that encompasses all operations against such resources. Distributed transactions, as any other transactions, must have all four ACID (atomicity, consistency, isolation, durability) properties, where atomicity guarantees all-or-nothing outcomes for the unit of work (operations bundle). Continue reading “Distributed transaction”

DMAIC

DMAIC (an acronym for Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control) (pronounced də-MAY-ick) refers to a data-driven improvement cycle used for improving, optimizing and stabilizing business processes and designs. The DMAIC improvement cycle is the core tool used to drive Six Sigma projects. However, DMAIC is not exclusive to Six Sigma and can be used as the framework for other improvement applications. Continue reading “DMAIC”

Distributed database

distributed database is a database in which not all storage devices are attached to a common processor.[1] It may be stored in multiple computers, located in the same physical location; or may be dispersed over a network of interconnected computers. Unlike parallel systems, in which the processors are tightly coupled and constitute a single database system, a distributed database system consists of loosely coupled sites that share no physical components. Continue reading “Distributed database”

Distributed data store

distributed data store is a computer network where information is stored on more than one node, often in a replicated fashion.[1] It is usually specifically used to refer to either a distributed database where users store information on a number of nodes, or a computer network in which users store information on a number of peer network nodes. Continue reading “Distributed data store”

Database engine

database engine (or storage engine) is the underlying software component that a database management system (DBMS) uses to create, read, update and delete (CRUD) data from a database. Most database management systems include their own application programming interface (API) that allows the user to interact with their underlying engine without going through the user interface of the DBMS. Continue reading “Database engine”

Disaster recovery

Disaster Recovery involves a set of policies, tools and procedures to enable the recovery or continuation of vital technology infrastructure and systems following a natural or human-induced disaster. Disaster recovery focuses on the IT or technology systems supporting critical business functions,[1] as opposed to business continuity, which involves keeping all essential aspects of a business functioning despite significant disruptive events. Disaster recovery can therefore be considered a subset of business continuity.[2][3] Continue reading “Disaster recovery”

DMAPI

Data Management API (DMAPI) is the interface defined in the X/Open document “Systems Management: Data Storage Management (XDSM) API” dated February 1997. XFS, IBM JFS, VxFS, AdvFS, StorNext and IBM Spectrum Scale file systems support DMAPI for Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM). Continue reading “DMAPI”